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Friday, December 9, 2022

Court of Pennsylvania: The Judge Determined that Ballots Previously Set Aside Could Not be Counted – 2 Days Before Election Day Secretary of State Lacks Authority to Change the Deadline

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On behalf of the Trump campaign on Thursday, a Pennsylvania judge ruled that the state could not count votes where the voters required to show evidence of the registration and refused to do so by Nov. 9.

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State law said that people had up to six days after the election to cure issues with a lack of evidence of identity this year, which was November 9. After the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled that three days after Election Day, mail-in ballots must be approved, Pennsylvania Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar issued a clarification that said evidence of identity should be given before November 12, which is six days from the deadline for approval of the vote. Two days before election day the guidance was released.

“[T]he Court concludes that Respondent Kathy Boockvar, in her official capacity as Secretary of the Commonwealth, lacked statutory authority to issue the November 1, 2020, guidance to Respondents County Boards of Elections insofar as that guidance purported to change the deadline … for certain electors to verify proof of identification,” Judge Mary Hannah Leavitt said in a court order.

Read here the COURT Order

Leavitt ruled on Thursday that such votes could not be counted.

This is one of the court challenges raised in Pennsylvania by the Trump campaign. They are expected to have a hearing on Friday over thousands of ballots that they say have been counted illegally amid the lack of necessary details.

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Furthermore, the campaign is pending action by the Supreme Court as to whether the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania behaved correctly in allowing the three-day extension to allow mail-in ballots.

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